The Empire of Ghana

How Did Islam Spread To The Empires Of West Africa: The Empire of GhanaHow Did Islam Spread To The Empires Of West Africa: The Empire of Ghana

Muslim geographers and historians have provided exceptional records of Muslim rulers and individuals in Africa. They had been the very first Negro persons who accepted Islam. Trade and trade paved the way for its introduction of new elements of material civilization, also made possible the intellectual advancement which naturally followed the introduction and spread of schooling.
They record famous trade routes in Africa – from Sijilmasa into Taghaza, Awdaghast, which resulted in the empire of Ghana, also from Sijilmasa into Tuat, Gao and Timbikutu. Al-Bakri clarifies Ghana as exceptionally advanced and efficiently a booming state as early as the eleventh century. He also discussed the effect of Islam in Mali in the 13th century also clarifies the principle of Mansa Musa, whose fame spread to Sudan, North Africa as well as Europe.

Islam attained the Savannah area from the 8th Century C.E., the date that the written history of West Africa starts The Muslim-Arab historians started to write about West Africa from the early 8th century. The famed scholar Ibn Munabbah composed as early as 738 C.E., followed closely by Al-Masudi at 947 C.E. Since Islam spread in the Savannah area, it was very natural that commercial connections must also come to be created with North Africa. Trade and trade also paved the way for its introduction of new elements of material civilization, also made possible the intellectual advancement which naturally followed the introduction and spread of literacy, and for which portions of the Sudan were to become renowned in the centuries ahead. At the Kingdom of Tekur, located on both banks of the Senegal, Islam was approved as early as 850 C.E., from the Dya’ogo dynasty. This dynasty was the first Negro individuals who accepted Islam.

It was because of this that Muslim-Arab historians called Bilad al-Tekur as ‘The Land of the Black Muslims.’ This gave a uniform Muslim legislation to the public. From now the Al- Murabitun of Almoravids started their assault on Tekur at 1042 C.E., Islam had left a profound effect on the people of the area. Al-Idrisi in 1511 clarified the Tekur Nation as ‘protected, calm and calm.’ The capital city of Tekur was likewise known as Tekur that had become the centre of trade. Merchants utilized to deliver wool to market there from Greater Morocco and consequently, took together diamonds and gold.

We’ve got enough records regarding the history of the area because it was called the Arab historians since the Bilad al-Sudan, the property of the Blacks. From the early phase, the very famous empires that grew that there are famous until our day: The empires of Ghana, Mali, Songhay, and Kanem Bornu.

There have been famous trade routes, such as the one from Sijilmasa into Taghaza, Awdaghast, that led to the empire of Ghana, and yet another from Sijilmasa into Tuat, Gao, and Timbikutu. You will find others which linked the current Nigeria with Tripoli through Fez into Bornu and Tunisia using Nigeria through Ghadames, Ghat, and Agades into Hausa land. These paths had made all of the aforementioned areas famous trade centers. These centers of commerce invariably became centers of Islamic learning and culture. New thoughts came through seeing traders within the subject of administrative practices. We will study briefly the growth of Islam in every one of the early empires of Western Sudan.
Islam from the Ancient Empire of Ghana

Al-Bakri, the Muslim geographer, provides us an ancient account of this early Soninke empire of Ghana. Economically, it was a booming nation. The King had used Muslim interpreters, and nearly all of his ministers and treasurers were also Muslims. The Muslim ministers were discovered enough to document occasions in Arabic and corresponded, on behalf of their king, with different rulers. “Additionally, as Muslims, they belonged to the larger body politic of the Islamic world, which could make it feasible to set up global relations.”

Al-Bakri provides the following image of Islam in Ghana from the 11th century:

The town of Ghana is made up of two cities lying on a plain, among which is occupied by Muslims and is big, owning 12 mosques among which will be a congregational mosque for Friday prayers: each includes its Imam, Muezzin and compensated reciters of the Quran. The city owns a great number of jurists, consults and discovered men.

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